News & Events

AfricaCom 2012 November 13 – 15 Capetown, South Africa. Visit Jinny at Hall 2 Stand B9

November 13 – 15 2012 | Capetown, South Africa

AfricaCom 2012

 Now in it’s 15th year, AfricaCom is embracing all aspects of the converging telecoms, media & ICT sectors to deliver the most inspiring, exciting and thought-provoking event yet.
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Jinny at Rich Communication November 6 – 7 2012 | Berlin



November 6 – 7, 2012 | Berlin, Germany

Rich Communication 2012

The only conference focused exclusively on the Rich Communications industry, and on realising the potential of RCS & Non-RCS products to enrich the end-user

Join Eddie Callaghan, Jinny Software’s Mobile Advertising Development Manager at 4.20 pm on Wednesday 7th November for further insight and discussion on the future for RCS
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A new integrated voice, video, social media and messaging service for your network; see our solution at booth #412 at the RCA Fall Convention

Give your subscribers access to a new integrated voice, video, social media and messaging service on your network, which offers a bridge between traditional and IP networks.

Talk to us at the RCA Convention on Sept. 23-24: we’ll show you how you can leverage our carrier-class platform Vavoomb to offer a much richer and reliable communication service than just mobile apps.

Send a meeting request to Michael.Gulledge(at)jinnysoftware.com or come to our booth #412 on either day of the show.

Discover your VAS in One solution at the MVNO Summit

MVNO Summit | 24-25 April | Barcelona Spain

Come to Stand 1 to meet us!

Jinny understands that the key strategic objectives for MVNOs everywhere are to find cost savings or add new services. Our VAS in One (ViO) solution is your answer to these challenges, and we are coming to the MVNO Industry Summit to introduce ViO to the MVNO community.

ViO enables operators to consolidate different VAS applications in one place:

It is the complete VAS portfolio

It is delivered on a standard platform

It is integrated with simple connection points

It has a single point of access and aggregation

It allows any VAS application to be  added without modifying the integration points

Download ViO datasheet

Make an appointment to meet Paul or Pieter at the MVNO Summit

Request a meeting with Jinny Software at MWC 2012

Jinny Software is now talking meeting requests for the Mobile World Congress 2012, Barcelona, February 27 – March 1

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Just published:Jinny CCO blogs on Vision2Mobile

Article by Richard Choi, Jinny CCO, on Vision2Mobile. With the increased demand of mobile video, mobile music, data, and the convergence of these services with social media platforms, the mobile phone market is growing rapidly. But the move toward these services leaves mobile carriers struggling with falling ARPU and the potential of being relegated to bit-pipe providers. How to counter these trends? Read it here.

The Growing Global Diaspora: Internationally Spread, Globally Connected

According to the second edition of the World Bank Migration and Remittances Factbook 2011, there are more than 215 million international migrants in the world. At US$325 billion in 2010, remittances received by developing countries far exceed the volume of official aid flows and constitute more than 10 percent of GDP in many developing countries. The shift in the pattern of migration is also a surprise; the volume of migration between developing economies is now larger than migration to high-income OECD countries – a change from the pattern of migration to the US, Western Europe and the Gulf.

*note: figures are # of millions

In ICT, the high growth economies of South and Central America, Africa and Asia are also experiencing significant expansion and development. Between 2000 and 2008 while global fixed broadband penetration jumped by almost 300% and mobile penetration by almost 400%, the increases were most significant in developing economies. In Latin America and the Caribbean, fixed broadband penetration jumped 300% and mobile penetration leaped 600%. In the Middle East and North Africa the corresponding figures were 1900% and 2500% respectively[1]. With these increases in connectivity comes the ability for the world’s migrants to be internationally-spread for economic or personal reasons but to be always globally connected.

Once connected, through convergence, the diaspora can interact with people at home in ways that were never possible before. As indicated by the remittance figures, money transfer home is clearly an application that people are keen to use but people are interacting in a range of ways. Socialbakers.com, a Facebook statistics portal, estimates that Africa, Asia and South America are the fastest growing Facebook regions with growths of 27%, 24% and 22% respectively in the three months to February 2011 meaning that relationships from the ‘real world’ are being taken on-line. Society and social interaction is becoming more about being networked and connected through next generation tools – particularly when you may be separated by many thousands of miles from family, friends and business partners. The networked society, by making distance irrelevant, has made a reality of the global village.

http://www.socialbakers.com/blog/116-the-rise-of-asia-and-africa-on-facebook-statistics-by-continent/

Author: Cathal O’Toole, Jinny Senior Product Manager 


[1] World Bank, The Little Data Book on Information and Communication Technology 2010, May 2010

Jinny Software Ready to Support Rural Cellulars Moving to LTE

As more data-hungry consumer devices and smartphones are being used by subscribers all over the US, operators large and small are preparing by building out their LTE networks – and members of the RCA are no different. Many RCA operators are planning to deploy their LTE infrastructure this year or next to prepare for the next generation of applications and devices. According to 4G Americas, as of August 22nd 2011, 26 US operators have deployed or plan to deploy their LTE infrastructure including such names as Bluegrass Cellular, Cellcom (WI, MI), Cellular South and nTelos. With the major players in the US already equipped for LTE, the RCA is keen to demonstrate its technical strengths by matching these national players with equally-powerful 4G networks.

Jinny Software has ensured that its solutions are able to integrate to many cellular network technologies simultaneously – GSM, CDMA, iDEN, UMTS and 4G LTE. By designing all VAS applications to support both circuit-switched and packet-switched network environments, Jinny has prepared for the networks that operators will seek to launch tomorrow – as well as the networks they are running today.

For example, Jinny has two solutions that deliver SMS for an operator moving to 4G LTE. Firstly, where the wireless carrier has a legacy 2G SMSC that it wishes to employ to provide SMS service in both the 2G/3G network and the 4G LTE network, Jinny provides the Jinny IP SM Gateway. The IP SM Gateway acts as a messaging-technology-aware bridge between the LTE/IMS network and the legacy SS7 circuit-switched network and gives operators a smooth migration of their legacy services.

Secondly, where the wireless carrier wishes to implement an SMSC that supports both packet-switched and circuit-switched environments seamlessly, the 4GMC (4G Messaging Centre) from Jinny Software provides the operator with the full suite of messaging services in both their legacy 2G/3G network and in their future-proof 4G LTE network simultaneously.

In addition to Jinny’s messaging solutions, the Jinny call completion solutions for voicemail, missed call notification and ring back tones are also IP-ready. All of these applications are delivered on a media architecture that supports both SS7 circuit-switched integration and IP-based interfaces for both voice and video thereby making the transition from 2G/3G to LTE simpler and easier for the mobile operator. In short, all Jinny VAS solutions are deployed on a standard platform that can integrate equally to a 2G, 3G or 4G LTE environment making the migration from today into tomorrow seamless across all VAS applications.

If the technology is not a concern for the RCA members, the regulatory environment presents some challenges. Rural operators want the FCC to mandate that 700 MHz LTE equipment incorporate all bands in the 700 MHz band as, unlike the past PCS and AWS spectrum auctions, interoperability was not mandated for the 700 MHz auction. The issue is that some market participants could seek equipment that only operates on their blocks of the 700 MHz spectrum. Jinny hopes that all parties will share in the benefits of LTE and seamless national data roaming for all subscribers.

Jinny ViO is the complete VAS portfolio delivered on a standard platform and integrated with simple connection points to the operator environment. Through ViO, Jinny can provide the full suite of VAS products to support the RCA members’ business today and into the future. As networks increasingly move to IP cores, Jinny’s SMS, MMS, USSD and call-based products are ready for the packet-switched environment. Jinny is attending the RCA Fall Expo from the 14th to the 16th of September in Las Vegas and would welcome the opportunity to discuss how Jinny’s VAS suite can support the RCA in moving into the future on LTE.

Author: Cathal O’Toole, Jinny Senior Product Manager

Links:

http://www.fiercebroadbandwireless.com/special-reports/despite-challenges-lte-catching-fire-among-rural-us-carriers

Apps overtake the world wide web: what does it mean for mobile operators?

A recent study from research company Flurry[1] has found that in June of this year, consumers spent 81 minutes per day using mobile apps, compared to 74 minutes of web surfing. OK, it’s a difference of 7 minutes, but think about it – we’ve had the web for a very long time (forever, if you were born during or after the 80s), but mobile apps have only been widespread since the launch of the iphone in 2007. We’re taking to mobile apps like ducks to water.

An article in Wired Magazine published a year ago entitled “The Web is Dead. Long Live the Internet” announced this trend: “The Web is, after all, just one of many applications that exist on the Internet, which uses the IP and TCP protocols to move packets around.” [2]

SoLoMo

Perhaps even more significant, global shipments of smartphones and tablets are on track to surpass shipments of PCs and laptops this year. This is the year where we can stop saying “the future is mobile”. The present is mobile. We might perhaps say that the future is “SoLoMo” – John Doerr’s portmanteau for Social, Local and Mobile.

The statistics on different platforms bears this out, too; Facebook now has 662 million users, and this number grows at 41% year-on-year. There are 130 million combined users of the iphone/itouch/ipad, with a growth rate of 103%. Nothwithstanding Google’s whopping 972 million users, its growth rate is a mere 8%.[3]

What about non-smartphone users?

apps for feature phonesMany of Jinny’s clients are mobile operators serving emerging markets. The penetration of mobile apps in this space is more complex; for one thing, the majority are using feature phones. Ovum says that the market for apps created for feature phones will almost double to US$1 billion by 2016, betting that feature phones will still account for the largest share of devices worldwide at that point, at a 63% global share. This is a contentious point, as you could argue that the price of smartphones will go down (especially with the rise of the Android platform), thereby encouraging emerging market users to take up the devices. Of course, 3G coverage would have to improve, or this would be pointless. But whether Ovum is right or not, all roads lead to a steady rise in the use of mobile apps.

Many of the things that have historically done well on the web – social networks, product and service reviewing, dating, buying and selling – do even better when you make them local and mobile.  The privacy and personalisation we get from web sites can now be further enhanced with features to ensure that whatever we are doing is tailored for where we are and what we want at any given moment. For example, why would you want to date someone who lives 100 miles away? (Unless, of course, you are happy to spend most of your dates on Facebook or Skype – I’m not judging here.)

What opportunities does this present for the mobile operator?

So what does this mean for the companies controlling the networks? Mobile operators sell the handsets, the voice minutes, the SMS bundles, and the data packages. Should they be getting in on the app action?

According  to Portio research[4], “MNOs have turned to value-added services in order to counter their falling voice ARPUs (Average Revenue per User) … And with mobile applications and services currently taking the mobile industry by storm and creating new opportunities, strategies are witnessing a seismic shift towards a stronger mobile applications focus …After all, this new league of apps and services has attracted millions of users worldwide and has helped MNOs to gain subscribers’ loyalty, and to also drive the next wave of subscriber acquisition.”

So far, so good: all these new apps and services are giving more people more reasons to want a mobile phone. But worryingly, Portio’s report summary goes on to say: “ MNOs need to be mindful of the long term ramifications – including that emerging disruptive applications and services ultimately threaten their key revenue generators: voice and SMS. Many of these new apps and services are placing considerable demands on network capacity, much of which is not consistent with generating increasing service revenues from subscribers.”

There appear to be two main issues:

  1. People are using mobile apps, including VoIP, which is having a negative impact on voice and messaging revenues, and
  2. Mobile apps and services are rapidly filling up network capacity, which creates infrastructure expense.

Maintaining ever greater capacity is expensive, and no one wants to pay for it. The challenge is to tap into the trend for mobile apps by leveraging the infrastructure to provide a level of service that the apps can’t match.

Here is where I start talking about what Jinny is doing to help our mobile operator customers. Our VAVOOMB™ product does something truly disruptive; it’s like Skype and Google voice rolled into one, and –  the Unique Selling Point – solves the problems of the VoIP solutions (delays, poor sound quality, unreliability) by using the voice network. It’s effectively an app that is operator-dependent. VAVOOMB lets people place and receive calls via VoIP on phones, tablets, or PCs, using their mobile phone number rather than a Skype name. And any time there is a problem with sound quality, they can seamlessly move the call to the carrier’s voice network.

Providing a superior alternative to Skype is just an example, and only one way to leverage network assets in the market. Because apps have broken ground and broadened the horizons of what people can do with mobile phones, operators have a real opportunity to add value to their services. It is up to service providers to take the lead and enable innovative new services that will attract customers – and revenue.

Author: Tania O’Connor, Jinny Head of Marketing and Communications

Learn more about VAVOOMB at www.vavoomb.com

Want to hear more about how Jinny is helping mobile operators and enterprises innovate to stay ahead of the curve? Get in touch with an expert

 


[1] http://blog.flurry.com/bid/63907/Mobile-Apps-Put-the-Web-in-Their-Rear-view-Mirror

[2] Anderson and Wolff. The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet.  August 17, 2010  Wired September 2010

[3] Meeker and Murphy, Top 10 Mobile Internet Trends (Feb 2011), Kleiner Perkins Caulfield & Byers.

[4] Disruptive Mobile Applications and Services 2011-2015; Analysis of New Disruptive Apps and Growth Forecasts for the Worldwide Mobile Applications Market to 2015. Portio Research.

 

 

A recent study from research company Flurry[1] has found that in June of this year, consumers spent 81 minutes per day using mobile apps, compared to 74 minutes of web surfing. OK, it’s a difference of 7 minutes, but think about it – we’ve had the web for a very long time (forever, if you were born during or after the 80s), but mobile apps have only been widespread since the launch of the iphone in 2007. We’re taking to mobile apps like ducks to water.

An article in Wired Magazine published a year ago entitled “The Web is Dead. Long Live the Internet” announced this trend: “The Web is, after all, just one of many applications that exist on the Internet, which uses the IP and TCP protocols to move packets around.” [2]

Perhaps even more significant, global shipments of smartphones and tablets are on track to surpass shipments of PCs and laptops this year. This is the year where we can stop saying “the future is mobile”. The present is mobile. We might perhaps say that the future is “SoLoMo” – John Doerr’s portmanteau for Social, Local and Mobile.

The statistics on different platforms bears this out, too; Facebook now has 662 million users, and this number grows at 41% year-on-year. There are 130 million combined users of the iphone/itouch/ipad, with a growth rate of 103%. Nothwithstanding Google’s whopping 972 million users, its growth rate is a mere 8%.[3]

Many of Jinny’s clients are mobile operators serving emerging markets. In these markets, mobile phones are often the first, and only, point of contact with the internet for many subscribers. Because they have no history of using web browsers on a PC, using mobile apps will make more sense. It won’t occur to these users to travel first through the layer of the world wide web to access things like gaming, social networking, or banking apps. (Jinny client company Safaricom has proved this with the success of its M-PESA banking service.) Ovum says that the market for apps created for feature phones will almost double to US$1 billion by 2016, betting that feature phones will still account for the largest share of devices worldwide at that point, at a 63% global share.

Many of the things that have historically done well on the web – social networks, product and service reviewing, dating, buying and selling – do even better when you make them local and mobile. The privacy and personalisation we get from web sites can now be further enhanced with features to ensure that whatever we are doing is tailored for where we are and what we want at any given moment. For example, why would you want to date someone who lives 100 miles away? (Unless, of course, you are happy to spend most of your dates on Facebook or Skype – I’m not judging here.)

So what does this mean for the companies controlling the networks? Mobile operators sell the handsets, the voice minutes, the SMS bundles, and the data packages. Should they be getting in on the app action?

According to Portio research[4], “MNOs have turned to value-added services in order to counter their falling voice ARPUs (Average Revenue per User) … And with mobile applications and services currently taking the mobile industry by storm and creating new opportunities, strategies are witnessing a seismic shift towards a stronger mobile applications focus …After all, this new league of apps and services has attracted millions of users worldwide and has helped MNOs to gain subscribers’ loyalty, and to also drive the next wave of subscriber acquisition.”

So far, so good: all these new apps and services are giving more people more reasons to want a mobile phone. But worryingly, Portio’s report summary goes on to say: “ MNOs need to be mindful of the long term ramifications – including that emerging disruptive applications and services ultimately threaten their key revenue generators: voice and SMS. Many of these new apps and services are placing considerable demands on network capacity, much of which is not consistent with generating increasing service revenues from subscribers.”

There appear to be two main issues:

1. People are using mobile apps, including VoIP, which is having a negative impact on voice and messaging revenues, and

2. Mobile apps and services are rapidly filling up network capacity, which creates infrastructure expense.

Maintaining ever greater capacity is expensive, and no one wants to pay for it. The challenge is to tap into the trend for mobile apps by leveraging the infrastructure to provide a level of service that the apps can’t match.

Here is where I start talking about what Jinny is doing to help our mobile operator customers. Our VAVOOMB™ product does something truly disruptive; it’s like Skype and Google voice rolled into one, and – the Unique Selling Point – solves the problems of the VoIP solutions (delays, poor sound quality, unreliability) by using the circuit-switched network. It’s effectively an app that is operator-dependent. VAVOOMB lets people place and receive calls via VoIP on phones, tablets, or PCs, using their mobile phone number rather than a Skype name. And any time there is a problem with sound quality, they can seamlessly move the call to the circuit-switched network.

Providing a superior alternative to Skype is just an example, and only one way to leverage network assets in the market. Because apps have broken ground and broadened the horizons of what people can do with mobile phones, operators have a real opportunity to add value to their services. It is up to service providers to take the lead and enable innovative new services that will attract customers – and revenue.

Learn more about VAVOOMB at www.vavoomb.com

Want to hear more about how Jinny is helping mobile operators and enterprises innovate to stay ahead of the curve? Get in touch with an expert

 


[1] http://blog.flurry.com/bid/63907/Mobile-Apps-Put-the-Web-in-Their-Rear-view-Mirror

[2] Anderson and Wolff. The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet. August 17, 2010  Wired September 2010

[3] Meeker and Murphy, Top 10 Mobile Internet Trends (Feb 2011), Kleiner Perkins Caulfield & Byers.

[4] Disruptive Mobile Applications and Services 2011-2015; Analysis of New Disruptive Apps and Growth Forecasts for the Worldwide Mobile Applications Market to 2015. Portio Research.